Salesforce Tower Wins ‘The Best Tall Building WorldWide’ International Award

Yes, worldwide. The Salesforce Tower took top honors this year in the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat’s (CTBU) most recent round of architectural honors, announced at Shenzhen, China. The Salesforce Tower beat out new buildings from Seoul to Sydney to Tel Aviv.

Why?

Because the Salesforce Tower is “a building that gives back” – and Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff couldn’t be more thrilled.

Photo of the 2019 Best Tall Building Worldwide Winner, Salesforce Tower, San Francisco by Nelson Kon

“Salesforce Tower was recognized for its multi-pronged focus on occupant health, sustainability, structural efficiency, and a significant level of integration with the surrounding urban habitat. The building stands as the centerpiece of a new transit-oriented, mixed-use neighborhood recently freed up for development following the demolition of an aging transit center. The result is not just a contribution to the city skyline, but a highly successful exercise in human-centric and resilient design for tall buildings,” per the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

Photo of the Salesforce Tower project team with their Best Tall Building Worldwide trophy. From left to right: Edward Dionne, Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, Paul Paradis, Hines Interests LP, Ron Klemencic, Magnusson Klemencic Associates, and Best Tall Building Jury Chair Karl Fender, Fender Katsalidis Architects.

 

What is the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat?

CTBU was founded in 1969 and headquartered in Chicago at the Illinois Institute of Technology, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is an international non-profit organization whose membership includes architects, engineers, planners, construction professionals, and educators from 77 countries, per CTBUH press release.

CTBUH has granted its annual architectural awards—dubbed simply the CTBUH Annual Awards—since 2002, recognizing what it considers the best new tall buildings around the world and the best designers.

“The CTBUH Annual Awards program recognizes projects and individuals that have made extraordinary contributions to the advancement of tall buildings and the urban environment, and that achieve sustainability at the highest and broadest level,” according to the organization’s site.

The organization looks at development projects all around the world and recognize projects that have made extraordinary contributions to the advancement of urban environment, and that achieve sustainability at the highest and broadest level. CTBUH gives awards in these categories:

 

 

For the Best Tall Building Award, CTBUH considers two levels of recognition:

  1. “Award of Excellence” winners, based on the online submission,
  2. all “Award of Excellence” winners then go forward to live presentation judging at the annual innovation conference, for consideration of the category winner overall.

The winning projects must also exhibit processes and/or innovations that have added to the profession of design and enhance the cities and the lives of their inhabitants. Some of the criteria for submission are outlined here.

In previous years, buildings like Oasia Downtown Hotel in Singapore, the Shanghai World Financial Center and Shanghai Tower in China won Best Tall Building.

Related imagePhoto of the Shanghai World Financial Center in Shanghai, China courtesy of dichandadang.com
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Photo of the Shanghai Tower in Shanghai, China courtesy of flickr.com

 

 

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Photo of the Oasia Downtown Hotel in Singapore courtesy of Flavorful Escape

 

 

Other winners this year include these honorees below, which can be viewed online here:

 

Finally, San Francisco’s Salesforce Tower wasn’t the only one recognized this year. Its neighbor, 181 Fremont also won two awards for engineering this year and was a runner up for best building in the 200 to 299 meters category.

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Photo of 181 Fremont, San Francisco designed by Heller Manus Architects. Photo courtesy of skyscrapercenter.com/CTBUH

 

Sources: CTBUH.org, Curbed SF, tallinnovation2019.com

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